Topic: Healthy Waters

Sort By: Alphabetical | Newest | Oldest

UpClose Publications Thumbnail
File Type:
File Size:

Learn about aquatic pollution by hearing directly from the people doing the research. From the field to the lab, UpClose takes you behind the scenes with the scientists working to make sense of this complicated topic.

Volume 1: Timothy Strathmann

In this issue:

Dr. Timothy Strathmann, an environmental engineer at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, has dedicated more than a decade to understanding the chemical principles at work behind environmental challenges such as ensuring long term water quality and developing renewable energy.

Publication Number: IISG-12-49

Volume 2: Maria Sepulveda

In this issue:

Dr. Maria Sepulveda works from her lab at Purdue University to uncover the impacts of environmental contaminants of fish and other wildlife.

Publication Number: IISG-13-02

Volume 3: John Kelly

In this issue:

Dr. John Kelly, a microbiologist at Loyola University Chicago, is working to shine a light on the impacts that human activities have on aquatic microbial communities, especially those that make their homes in rivers or lakes.

Publication Number: IISG-13-77W

Volume 4: Melody Bernot

In this issue:

Dr. Melody Bernot, an ecologist at Ball State University, is probing deeper into some of the biggest questions in pharmaceutical and personal care produce (PPCP) research.

Publication Number: IISG-13-81

Volume 5: Rebecca Klaper

In this issue:

Dr. Rebecca Klaper, an ecologist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is searching for practical solution for the design, use, and management of pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants found in the environment.

Publication Number: IISG-13-87

Volume 6: Sam Mason

In this issue:

Dr. Sherri “Sam” Mason, a chemistry professor at State University of New York Fredonia, has documented the quantity of plastic in the Great Lakes, putting a spotlight on microplastic pollution in freshwater systems and the potential impacts.

Publication Number: IISG-14-25

Volume 7: Steven Mauro

In this issue:

Dr. Steven Mauro from Grannon University discusses research on the ways pharmaceuticals are changing the bacterial communities that help keep aquatic ecosystems healthy.

Publication Number: IISG-14-87

Volume 8: Dana Kolpin

In this issue:

Dana Kolpin, head of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Emerging Contaminants Project, discussed the first-ever nationwide study that discovered trace amounts of emerging contaminants in streams across the country.

Publication Number: IISG-14-100 E

Volume 9: Barbara Mahler

In this issue:

Dr. Barbara Mahler, research hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey, discussed her work investigating the toxic chemicals associated with pavement sealants impact local environments.

Publication Number: IISG-15-011 E

Volume 10: Lorena Rios Mendoza

In this issue:

Dr. Lorena Rios Mendoza from the University of Wisconsin Superior talks about her work to identify the chemicals that build up on the surface of microplastics and how photodegradation may alter the way they react to one another.

Publication Number IISG-15-028 E

Volume 11: Michael Lydy

In this issue:

Dr. Michael Lydy from Southern Illinois University Carbondale, investigates the complex chemical and biological factors affecting pesticide toxicity in urban streams.

Publication Number: IISG-15-16-008

Volume 12: Tim Hoellein

In this issue:

Dr. Tim Hoellein from Loyola University Chicago, investigates the interactions between common pollutants and organisms in rivers and streams.

Publication Number: IISG-16-021

Download File

Lake Michigan Health: A Deeper Dive Thumbnail
File Type:
File Size:

As part of the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI), over 40 scientists from 15 agencies gathered in 2015 to take stock of the health of Lake Michigan. They focused on assessing several critical concerns in Lake Michigan: the lower food web, which may be depleted by invasive zebra and quagga mussels, the condition of key prey fish species, and the impact of contaminants on water quality and in the food chain.

Download File

Don’t “P” On Your Lawn Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 2.92 MB

Lawn to Lake provides information on how to protect water quality through natural lawn care. This rack card explains the benefits of using phosphorus-free (P-free) fertilizer and natural lawn care products.

Download File

Right Plant, Right Place: Selecting Turfgrass for Homeowners Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 3.21 MB

This brochure is a part of a natural lawn care communication campaign developed and refined through a series of grant funded homeowner surveys and focus groups. The goal is to address the issue of lawn care-related pollution in watersheds by targeting outreach efforts directly towards homeowners engaged in lawn care. Choosing the right turfgrass species for the lawn’s growing conditions is an important management practice. This brochure provides a brief introduction to turfgrass growth habits, a checklist for understanding your lawn’s growing conditions and provides a turfgrass selection guide.

References:

 

  1. Reicher, Z., Bigelow, C., Patton, A., & Voigt, T. (2006). Zoysiagrass for Indiana. Purdue Extension. https://turf.purdue.edu/extpub/zoysiagrass-for-indiana/
  2. Fresenburg, B., Miller, L. (n.d.) Managing Lawns and Turfgrass. University of Missouri Extension. https://extension2.missouri.edu/mg10
  3. Hentschel, R., & Spangenberg, B. (n.d.). Groundcovers as lawn alternatives. University of Illinois Extension. https://web.extension.illinois.edu/lawntalk/other/groundcovers_as_lawn_alternatives.cfm
  4. Reicher, Z., Throssell, C. (1998, July). Improving Lawns in the Shade. Purdue Extension. https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/AY/AY-14-W.pdf
  5. Braun, R. C., Patton, A. J., Watkins, E., Koch, P. L., Anderson, N. P., Bonos, S. A., & Brilman, L. A. (2020). Fine fescues: A review of the species, their improvement, production, establishment, and management. Crop Science, 60(3), 1142–1187. https://doi.org/10.1002/csc2.20122
  6. Murphy, J. A. (1996, September). Fine Fescues: Low Maintenance Species for Turf. Rutgers Cooperative Research and Extension. https://njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/publication.php?pid=FS688
  7. Laskowski, M. (2018, July). Making roadsides greener by selecting salt tolerant turfgrasses. University of Minnesota: Turfgrass Science. https://turf.umn.edu/news/making-roadsides-greener-selecting-salt-tolerant-turfgrasses
Download File

Soil Testing for a Healthy Lawn Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 2.86 MB

This brochure is a part of a natural lawn care communication campaign developed and refined through a series of grant funded homeowner surveys and focus groups. The goal is to address the issue of lawn care-related pollution in watersheds by targeting outreach efforts directly towards homeowners engaged in lawn care. Survey data revealed that soil testing is a lawn care practice overlooked by homeowners. This brochure aims address the importance of soil testing as it relates to turfgrass health.

References:

 

  1. Lee, S., & McCann, L. (2018). Passage of Phosphorus-free Lawn Fertilizer Laws by U.S. States. Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, 8(1-2), 66-88. Retrieved July 17, 2020, from www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/naturesopolirese.8.1-2.0066
Download File

Managing Lawn Pests with Fewer Chemicals Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 2.54 MB

This brochure is a part of a natural lawn care communication campaign developed and refined through a series of grant funded homeowner surveys and focus groups. The goal is to address the issue of lawn care-related pollution in watersheds by targeting outreach efforts directly towards homeowners engaged in lawn care. Managing lawn pests was identified as a main concern for homeowners. Integrated Pest Management (IPM), outlined in this brochure is a tool homeowners can implement to minimize reliance on pesticides, reduce treatment costs, improve lawn health and protect surface and ground water.

References:

 

  1. Environmental Protection Agency. (2017, August). Introduction to Integrated Pest Management. https://www.epa.gov/managing-pests-schools/introduction-integrated-pest-management
  2. UC IPM. What Is Integrated Pest Management (IPM)? University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program. (UC IPM). https://www2.ipm.ucanr.edu/What-is-IPM/
  3. Calhoun, R. N. (2015). Integrated Pest Management for Home Lawns. MSU Extension. https://www.canr.msu.edu/resources/integrated-pest-management-for-home-lawns
  4. Reicher, Z., Throssell, C. (1998, July). Improving Lawns in the Shade. Purdue Extension. https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/AY/AY-14-W.pdf
  5. Environmental Protection Agency. (2017, June 28). Healthy Lawn, Healthy Environment: Caring for Your Lawn in an Environmentally Friendly Way. https://www.epa.gov/safepestcontrol/healthy-lawn-healthy-environment-caring-your-lawn-environmentally-friendly-way
  6. Pennsylvania State University. (n.d.). Pennsylvania Integrated Pest Management [Brochure]. Pennsylvania Integrated Pest Management. http://www.paasthma.org/images/docs/IPM_brochure.pdf
  7. Pennsylvanian State University Extension. (2011, March). Steps of Integrated Pest Management. https://extension.psu.edu/steps-of-integrated-pest-management-ipm
Download File

IISG Focus: Education Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 3.66 MB

This is a quick summary of IISG’s opportunities and resources to help teachers and other educators increase their Great Lakes literacy, and ultimately that of their students.

Download File

Skip to content