Topic: Fisheries

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Salmon and Trout of the Great Lakes: A Visual Identification Guide Thumbnail
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The Great Lakes are home to eight species of salmon and trout. These species can be difficult to distinguish from each other as they overlap in their distributions and change appearance depending on their habitat and the time of year. This illustrated, peer-reviewed, two-page guide, courtesy of the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network, shows important body features and helpful tips to identify and distinguish between salmon and trout species in the Great Lakes.

This document is available through the Purdue University Extension Education Store at https://edustore.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=FNR-579-W

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Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) Lake Michigan 2015 Report Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 7.78 MB

The role of the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) is to provide enhanced monitoring and research activities that provide relevant information to address the science priorities of the Lake Partnerships (established under the Lakewide Management Annex of the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement) across the Laurentian Great Lakes. The Lake Michigan Partnership, a collaborative team of natural resource managers led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency with participation from federal, state, tribal, and local governments or agencies, uses the information collected through CSMI to help develop long term ecosystem-based management strategies for protecting and restoring Lake Michigan’s water quality. On a practical level, CSMI is an intensive effort to collect information on the health of each lake, rotating to one Great Lake each year. In 2015, it was Lake Michigan’s turn. This is an executive summary of the 2015 research results and the associated white paper containing more specific information.

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Summary report of the “Plastics research in the Great Lakes: identifying gaps and facilitating collaboration” session presented during the 60th annual International Association for Great Lakes Research conference (IAGLR) Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 266.39 KB

This session was one of the largest at the 60th annual IAGLR conference, with 18 oral presentations, 1 poster presentation, and 1 facilitated discussion period. The full list of abstracts (with author contact information) is included as Appendix 1. This session was well-attended throughout the day, with as many as 70 people attending the individual talks.

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This item is a vinyl fish ruler with an adhesive backing for anglers to place the ruler either in their tackle box or attached somewhere in their boat. They can use the ruler to measure their catch. In addition to the ruler, there is information for Indiana anglers concerning the Fish Consumption Advisories as written by the state.

For more information and to obtain a decal, please contact Leslie Dorworth

Image of full sticker.

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What’s on the Menu for Salmon and Trout in Lake Michigan? Thumbnail
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This extension publication intends to educate audiences on Lake Michigan ecosystem changes and their effect on target species such as salmon and trout. This may provide audiences with a better understanding on key management strategies (e.g., decreases in salmon stocking rates) used by state fisheries agencies. Additionally, an increased understanding of what salmon and trout are eating in Lake Michigan may help anglers better target these species, which may increase catch rates and overall enjoyment of fishing.

This document is available through the Purdue University Extension Education Store at https://edustore.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=FNR-565-W

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Charting New Waters: The Lake Michigan Nearshore Food Web Thumbnail
File Type: pdf
File Size: 1.87 MB

What are the most critical concerns facing Lake Michigan? The Great Lakes Regional Research and Information Network (GLRRIN) Lake Michigan team set out to answer this question by bringing together more than 50 government and academic researchers over several meetings to share what’s known, what isn’t, and what information would be most valuable to inform resource managers and others interested in the health of the lake.

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